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People pay their respects on Thursday at a memorial set up outside Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, the scene of the United States' most recent mass shooting. The killing of 19 children and two adults has reignited heated debates over gun control. Dario Lopez-Mills/AP hide caption

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Dario Lopez-Mills/AP

Special counsel John Durham, the prosecutor appointed to investigate potential government wrongdoing in the early days of the Trump-Russia probe, arrives to the E. Barrett Prettyman Federal Courthouse on May 16 in Washington. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Gun control advocates hold signs during a protest at Discovery Green across from the National Rifle Association Annual Meeting at the George R. Brown Convention Center on Friday in Houston, Texas. Eric Thayer/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Thayer/Getty Images

People visit memorials Thursday for victims of the mass shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Here's what experts say police should have done in the Uvalde school shooting

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Former President Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally in Greensburg, Pa., on May 6. A federal judge on Friday dismissed Trump's lawsuit against New York Attorney General Letitia James, allowing her civil investigation into his business practices to continue. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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Gene J. Puskar/AP

Farmworkers near Fresno, Calif., pick paper trays of dried raisins off the ground and heap them onto a trailer in the final step of raisin harvest on Sept. 24, 2013. Gosia Wozniacka/AP hide caption

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Gosia Wozniacka/AP

Law enforcement and first responders gather outside Robb Elementary School following Tuesday's shooting in Uvalde, Texas. Their response has since come under wide scrutiny. Dario Lopez-Mills/AP hide caption

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Dario Lopez-Mills/AP

A law enforcement personnel lights a candle outside Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, Wednesday, May 25, 2022. Desperation turned to heart-wrenching sorrow for families of grade schoolers killed after an 18-year-old gunman barricaded himself in their Texas classroom and began shooting, killing several fourth-graders and their teachers. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

A cross and Bible sculpture stand outside the Southern Baptist Convention headquarters in Nashville, Tenn., on Tuesday. Southern Baptist leaders have released a list of hundreds of pastors and other church-affiliated personnel accused of sexual abuse. Holly Meyer/AP hide caption

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Holly Meyer/AP

CEO and executive vice president of the National Rifle Association, Wayne LaPierre, speaks during the NRA Annual Meetings & Exhibits in Houston. Toya Sarno Jordan for NPR hide caption

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Toya Sarno Jordan for NPR

A worker carries used drink bottles and cans for recycling at a collection point in Brooklyn, New York. Three decades of recycling have so far failed to reduce what we throw away, especially plastics. Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images

Victor Escalon, a regional director with the Texas Department of Public Safety, gives a news conference in Uvalde on Thursday. Allison Dinner/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Allison Dinner/AFP via Getty Images

Mass shootings are so common that mayors now have a checklist for when one happens

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Elena Mendoza, 18, on Thursday grieves in front of a cross honoring her cousin, Amerie Jo Garza, one of the victims killed in this week's elementary school shooting in Uvalde, Texas. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Black or brown hydrogen is extracted from coal. Gray hydrogen is made by heating natural gas. Both create carbon dioxide. Blue hydrogen captures about 90% of that carbon dioxide and stores it, usually underground. Green hydrogen uses renewable energy to split hydrogen out of water using electricity. Pink hydrogen does the same but relies on nuclear power. Meredith Miotke for NPR hide caption

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Meredith Miotke for NPR

A view of Manhattan's Chinatown. Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

A new app guides visitors through NYC's Chinatown with hidden stories

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People walk past a COVID testing site on May 17 in New York City. New York's health commissioner, Dr. Ashwin Vasan, has moved from a "medium" COVID-19 alert level to a "high" alert level in all the five boroughs following a surge in cases. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Still from Ira Sachs's film Last Address. Last Address hide caption

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Last Address

Black artists have always led AIDS activism. This tribute wants to give them credit

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