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Indiana University's board of trustees voted earlier this month to strip David Starr Jordan's name from a building. Jordan was the university's seventh president and a leader of the eugenics movement. Lauren Bavis/WFYI hide caption

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Lauren Bavis/WFYI

President Donald Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden participate in the first presidential debate on Sept. 29. The Debate Commission has established new rules for Thursday's debate, including plans to mute a candidate's mic when the other is giving an opening statement. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

Channing Dungey was named the next chairman of Warner Bros. Television Group. She previously served in executive roles at ABC and Netflix. She is seen here at the Fortune Most Powerful Women Summit 2018. Phillip Faraone/Getty Images for Fortune hide caption

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Phillip Faraone/Getty Images for Fortune

Mental health advocates say 988, a simple three-digit number, will be easier for people to remember in the midst of a mental health emergency. T2 Images/Getty Images/Cultura RF hide caption

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T2 Images/Getty Images/Cultura RF

New Law Creates 988 Hotline For Mental Health Emergencies

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The U.S.-Canada border at Pittsburg, N.H., in 2017. The U.S. borders with Canada and Mexico will stay closed to nonessential travel through Nov. 21. Don Emmert/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Don Emmert/AFP via Getty Images

More than 1,000,000 Americans left the workforce in September. About 80% of them were women. Nam Y. Huh/AP hide caption

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Nam Y. Huh/AP

The Economy Is Driving Women Out Of The Workforce And Some May Not Return

Women are dropping out of the workforce in much higher numbers than men. Valerie Wilson of the Economic Policy Institute explains that women are overrepresented in jobs that have been hit hardest by the pandemic and child care has gotten harder to come by.

The Economy Is Driving Women Out Of The Workforce And Some May Not Return

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A judge has tossed out a U.S. Department of Agriculture rule that would have limited food stamps, noting that during the pandemic "SNAP rosters have grown by over 17 percent with over 6 million new enrollees." Here, a sign alerts customers about food stamps at a store in New York City. Scott Heins/Getty Images hide caption

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Akeil Robertson/Philadelphia District Attorney's Office

Artist In Residence Creates Portraits Of Reform At The District Attorney's Office

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President Trump criticized Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation's leading infectious disease expert, as a "disaster" for the nation's coronavirus response. Graeme Jennings/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Graeme Jennings/Pool/Getty Images

President Trump tours a section of the border wall in San Luis, Ariz., on June 23. The Supreme Court is agreeing to review a Trump administration policy that makes asylum-seekers wait in Mexico for U.S. court hearings. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

A second excavation is planned in Tulsa, Okla., this week to unearth potential unmarked mass graves from a race massacre in 1921. In July, researchers began excavation at Oaklawn Cemetery, shown here. They found no evidence of human remains at that particular excavation site. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP

More than 40 million coronavirus infections have now been reported worldwide. Here, a staff member at a school in Moscow uses an infrared thermometer on Monday to screen students. Sergei Fadeichev/TASS via Getty Images hide caption

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Sergei Fadeichev/TASS via Getty Images

Thomas poses for a portrait at the African American Burial Ground for the Enslaved at Belmont. Thomas restored the graveyard and then used it to bury her teenage son when he drowned in June. Tyrone Turner/WAMU hide caption

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Tyrone Turner/WAMU

A Pastor Rescues A Cemetery For Enslaved People, Then Buries Her Son In It

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Mail-in ballots that need to be reviewed because of signature discrepancies sit in boxes at the Miami-Dade County Elections Department in Doral, Fla., on Oct. 15. Signature problems are a frequent reason that ballots are rejected, though many states allow voters to fix those problems before Election Day. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Race For A (Ballot) Cure: The Scramble To Fix Absentee-Ballot Problems

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The Louisiana Supreme Court building is pictured in New Orleans. Fair Wayne Bryant was convicted in 1997 of stealing hedge clippers and sentenced to life. Bill Haber/AP hide caption

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Bill Haber/AP

TikTok says it is banning all accounts that share content related to the QAnon conspiracy theory, hardening its previous policy on the far-right movement. Kiichiro Sato/AP hide caption

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Kiichiro Sato/AP

TikTok Tightens Crackdown On QAnon, Will Ban Accounts That Promote Disinformation

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