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Rep. Raúl Grijalva, D-Ariz., (left) speaks before the start of a House Natural Resources Committee in June. Grijalva recently tested positive for the coronavirus. Bill Clark/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Clark/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Pedestrians pass signs near a polling site in San Antonio in February. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Drive-Through Voting? Texas Gets Creative In Its Scramble For Polling Places

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Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine was tested as part of a protocol to meet with President Trump. His first test result was positive but the second was negative. Kirk Irwin/Getty Images hide caption

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Kirk Irwin/Getty Images

Facebook said the president's claims violated its coronavirus misinformation policy, in a rare departure from the social network's largely hands-off approach to politicians. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Twitter, Facebook Remove Trump Post Over False Claim About Children And COVID-19

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"It's easy and I think it's a beautiful setting," President Trump said of giving his Republican renomination speech from the White House. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Poll workers must take extra precautions this year to protect themselves against the coronavirus. Election experts fear a massive shortage of workers at the polls in November. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

Wanted: Young People To Work The Polls This November

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Presumptive Democratic nominee Joe Biden, seen here at a campaign event in July, says he won't tear down the border wall put in place during the Trump administration. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images
Audrey Carlsen/NPR

Senate Republicans Face Uphill Fight To Hold Majority

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Matthew Bruce of Des Moines, Iowa, signs a note during a Black Lives Matter demonstration outside Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds' office in June. The Republican governor has signed an executive order restoring voting rights to people convicted of a felony. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Charlie Neibergall/AP

Governor Acts To Restore Voting Rights To Iowans With Felony Convictions

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Nika Cotton recently opened Soulcentricitea in Kansas City, Mo. When public schools shut down in the spring, Cotton had no one to watch her young children who are 8 and 10. So she quit her job in social work — and lost her health insurance — in order to start her own business. Alex Smith/KCUR hide caption

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Alex Smith/KCUR

Former Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates arrived for a ceremony for FBI Director Christopher Wray in 2017. Yates is set to appear before a Senate panel looking into the Russia investigation. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

A U.S. Border Patrol vehicle is stationed in front of the U.S.-Mexico border barrier as construction continues in hard-hit Imperial County on July 22, in Calexico, Calif. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Former Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach addresses the crowd as he announces his candidacy for the Republican nomination for the U.S. Senate on July 8, 2019, in Leavenworth, Kan. Charlie Riedel/AP hide caption

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Charlie Riedel/AP

U.S. Census Bureau worker Jennifer Pope wears a face covering at a walk-up counting site in Greenville, Texas, on July 31. The bureau is ending all counting efforts for the 2020 census on Sept. 30, a month sooner than previously announced, the bureau's director confirmed Monday. LM Otero/AP hide caption

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LM Otero/AP

Census Cuts All Counting Efforts Short By A Month

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Some Washington Republicans worry that Kris Kobach, a polarizing conservative who lost a race for governor last year, would become the GOP's Senate candidate and lose in the general election. Charlie Riedel/AP hide caption

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Charlie Riedel/AP

When asked in an interview whether he found the late Rep. John Lewis impressive, President Trump took credit for having done more for Black Americans than anybody else. Doug Mills/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Doug Mills/Pool/Getty Images