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Tabitha (l) helps Sam (r) remove his socks and leg braces. Tuesday, June 18th, 2024 in Georgia, United States. Cindy Elizabeth/NPR hide caption

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Cindy Elizabeth/NPR

Noise pollution from human activities can have negative impacts on our health—from sleep disturbances and stress to increases in the risk of heart disease and diabetes. tolgart/Getty Images hide caption

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tolgart/Getty Images

How noise pollution from planes, trains and automobiles can harm human health

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Illustration of a brain and genomic DNA on a dark blue particle background. Yuichiro Chino/Getty Images hide caption

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Yuichiro Chino/Getty Images

Researchers are figuring out how African ancestry can affect certain brain disorders

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Daniel Hertzberg

Participants hold signs during March for Our Lives 2022 on June 11, 2022 in Washington, DC. Paul Morigi/Getty Images for March For Our Lives hide caption

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Paul Morigi/Getty Images for March For Our Lives

Gun violence is getting worse. Can a shift in perspective be the solution?

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Freelance science writer Sadie Dingfelder is the author of the new book Do I Know You?, which explores human sight, memory and imagination. Little, Brown Spark, an imprint of Little, Brown and Company hide caption

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Little, Brown Spark, an imprint of Little, Brown and Company

The human brain is hardwired to recognize faces. But what if you can't?

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JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA: The examination room in a clinic, which provides abortion care on April 30, 2024, in Jacksonville, Florida. A six-week abortion ban that Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis signed will go into effect on May 1st. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images) Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

More primary care doctors could begin to provide abortions

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Pixar's new movie Inside Out 2 revisits the internal life of Riley, as she hits puberty and copes with a growing range of emotions. Pixar hide caption

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Pixar

Social media platforms are part of what the U.S. surgeon general is calling a youth mental health crisis. doble-d/Getty hide caption

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'An unfair fight': The U.S. surgeon general declares war on social media

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A heat dome that began in Mexico in May moved into the U.S. in early June causing sweltering temperatures. Michala Garrison/NASA Earth Observatory hide caption

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Michala Garrison/NASA Earth Observatory

How the current heat dome can affect human health

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William A. Fitzgerald and Bobby Carnavale in the film Ezra. Bleeker Street hide caption

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Bleeker Street

Hollywood flips the script in the new movie 'Ezra'

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United States Marines in Afghanistan carry colleague LCPL Jerome Hanley of Massachusetts, who was wounded in an insurgent attack to a waiting medevac helicopter in 2011. Kevin Frayer/AP hide caption

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Kevin Frayer/AP

Battlefield medicine has come a long way. But that progress could be lost

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Later this year, the FDA plans to decide whether MDMA can be used to treat PTSD Eva Almqvist/Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Almqvist/Getty Images

Like the gut, microbes are important for a healthy vaginal ecosystem. Getty Images/Kateryna Kon/Science Photo Library hide caption

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Getty Images/Kateryna Kon/Science Photo Library

A microbiome transplant could help people with bacterial vaginosis

Humans rely on our symbiotic relationship with good microbes—in the gut, the skin and ... the vagina. Fatima Aysha Hussain studies what makes a healthy vaginal microbiome. She talks to host Emily Kwong about her long-term transplant study that asks the question: Can one vagina help another through a microbe donation?

A microbiome transplant could help people with bacterial vaginosis

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Anti-abortion activists who describe themselves as "abolitionists" protest outside a fertility clinic in North Carolina in April 2024. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

Anti-abortion hardliners want restrictions to go farther. It could cost Republicans

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This 2005 electron microscope image shows an avian influenza A H5N1 virion. On Wednesday, Michigan health officials said a farmworker has been diagnosed with bird flu, the second human case connected to an outbreak in U.S. dairy cows. Cynthia Goldsmith, Jackie Katz/CDC/AP hide caption

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Cynthia Goldsmith, Jackie Katz/CDC/AP
Hilary Fung/NPR

6 key facts about abortion laws and the 2024 election

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