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Special counsel John Durham, the prosecutor appointed to investigate potential government wrongdoing in the early days of the Trump-Russia probe, arrives to the E. Barrett Prettyman Federal Courthouse, Monday, May 16, 2022, in Washington. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

As a jury weighs if a lawyer lied to the FBI, Durham's legacy hangs in the balance

Michael Sussmann faces one charge of lying to the FBI ahead of the 2016 presidential election. It's the first courtroom test for special counsel John Durham, appointed by the Trump administration.

Gua Sha, a facial massage technique in traditional Chinese medicine, has reached viral fame, thanks to social media influencers in the West. Tanja Ivanova/Getty Images hide caption

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Tanja Ivanova/Getty Images

Asian founders work to steer the narrative as beauty trends pull from their cultures

The latest obsessions in America's wellness craze are rooted in South Asian practices. Industry leaders who grew up with those rituals are caught between joy and a battle against cultural erasure.

Scientists have discovered that a drug used to treat HIV helps restore a particular kind of memory loss in mice. The results hold promise for humans, too. Robert F. Bukaty/AP hide caption

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Robert F. Bukaty/AP

A drug for HIV appears to reverse a type of memory loss in mice

In mice, the HIV drug maraviroc restored a system that links new memories that are made around the same time. The finding could help treat memory problems in people.

A drug for HIV appears to reverse a type of memory loss in mice

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A protester stands outside the annual NRA convention in Houston on Friday, holding a sign honoring the 19 children and two adults killed in the Uvalde, Texas, elementary school shooting. Lucio Vasquez/Houston Public Media hide caption

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Lucio Vasquez/Houston Public Media

National

As the NRA meets in Houston, hundreds rally in opposition

Houston Public Media News 88.7

Protestors outside held signs and shouted slogans like "lives over profits" and "asesinos" — "killers" in Spanish — as people of all ages protested the group's annual gathering.

Sen. Chris Murphy, D-Conn., addresses a rally with fellow Senate Democrats and gun control advocacy groups outside the U.S. Capitol on Thursday. Organized by Moms Demand Action, Everytown for Gun Safety and Students Demand Action, the rally brought together members of Congress and gun violence survivors to demand gun safety legislation following mass shootings in Buffalo, N.Y., and Uvalde, Texas. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Senators are continuing talks during recess to find a compromise on gun legislation

Democratic Sen. Chris Murphy says he's optimistic that something can be done to address mass shootings like the one at a Texas elementary school that killed 19 children.

Senators are continuing talks during recess to find a compromise on gun legislation

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A memorial for the victims of the mass shooting at Robb Elementary School is seen on Friday in Uvalde, Texas. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Another mass shooting, but nothing changes

NPR's Scott Simon remarks on what has become a never-ending parade of mass shootings in the U.S., and the lack of effort over the years to address them.

Opinion: Another mass shooting, but nothing changes

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Firefighter Christian Cortes, radio in hand, watches the progress of ground crews fighting part of the Grizzly Creek fire above Air Ranch on Aug. 21, 2020. Hart Van Denburg/CPR News hide caption

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Hart Van Denburg/CPR News

National

Low pay and slow reforms could spell staffing trouble for federal firefighting efforts

CPR News

As climate change helps fuel a wildfire season that's starting earlier, lasting longer and growing more intense, federal agencies are once again facing staffing shortages as funding for pay increases and other reforms has stalled.

Smallpox vaccines being administered in Paris in 1941. When the disease was eradicated and vaccination came to a stop, that created an opening for its virus relative monkeypox. Roger Viollet via Getty Images hide caption

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Roger Viollet via Getty Images

Scientists warned us about monkeypox in 1988. Here's why they were right.

Their prediction stemmed from the eradication of smallpox. Here's what they said more than three decades ago — and how it foreshadowed events of 2022.

Scientists warned us about monkeypox in 1988. Here's why they were right.

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Timothy Hale-Cusanelli of New Jersey was found guilty on all five criminal counts he was charged with. Hale-Cusanelli breached the U.S. Capitol building on Jan. 6, 2021, though he did not assault police or commit property damage that day. Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

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Julio Cortez/AP

Former Army Reservist and alleged white supremacist found guilty in Capitol riot trial

A jury found Timothy Hale-Cusanelli guilty for breaching the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. The trial included dramatic testimony secretly recorded by Hale-Cusanelli's former roommate.

LA Johnson/NPR

What to say to kids when the news is scary

Whether a school shooting or a deadly tornado, scary events in the news can leave parents struggling to know when — and how — they should talk with their kids about it. Rosemarie Truglio of Sesame Workshop and Tara Conley, a media studies professor at Montclair State University, give us tips.

What to say to kids when the news is scary

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People walk past a Covid testing site on May 17. in New York City. New York's health commissioner, Dr. Ashwin Vasan, has moved from a "medium" COVID-19 alert level to a "high" alert level in all the five boroughs following a surge in cases. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

The real COVID surge is (much) bigger than it looks. But don't panic

Thanks to at-home testing, official reports are missing a lot of the COVID cases circulating now. Is the U.S. in the midst of an invisible surge? Here's how to assess the situation where you live.

John Legend poses backstage during the LDF 34th National Equal Justice Awards Dinner on May 10, 2022 in New York City. Arturo Holmes/Getty Images for Legal Defense Fund hide caption

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Arturo Holmes/Getty Images for Legal Defense Fund

John Legend wants to transform the criminal justice system, one DA at a time

Musician John Legend is using his national platform to elevate local races for district attorney — endorsing progressive prosecutors who prioritize preventative solutions over incarceration.

John Legend wants to transform the criminal justice system, one DA at a time

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A worker carries used drink bottles and cans for recycling at a collection point in Brooklyn, New York. Three decades of recycling have so far failed to reduce what we throw away, especially plastics. Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images

We never got good at recycling plastic. Some states are trying a new approach

New York is the latest, and largest, state to consider charging product-makers to dispose of their packaging. But lawmakers are clashing over how much to involve industry in creating a new system.

Attendees during a closing campaign rally for presidential candidate Gustavo Petro in Bogotá, Colombia. Petro is ahead in the polls for this Sunday's election, but it's expected to go to a second round in June. Andres Cardona/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Andres Cardona/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Colombia goes into elections Sunday with a leftist looking to make history

Colombia's presidential election is Sunday, and for the first time, a leftist candidate is favored to come out ahead. Business elites are nervous.

Colombia goes into elections Sunday with a leftist looking to make history

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