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In this image taken from video released by Russian Defense Ministry Press Service on Saturday, a new Zircon hypersonic cruise missile is launched by the frigate Admiral Gorshkov of the Russian navy from the Barents Sea. Russian Defense Ministry Press Service via AP hide caption

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Russian Defense Ministry Press Service via AP

Workers unload a FedEx cargo plane carrying 100,000 pounds of baby formula at Washington Dulles International Airport, in Chantilly, Va., on Wednesday. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

Gua Sha, a facial massage technique in traditional Chinese medicine, has reached viral fame, thanks to social media influencers in the West. Tanja Ivanova/Getty Images hide caption

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Tanja Ivanova/Getty Images

Police officers walk past a makeshift memorial for the shooting victims at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, on Thursday. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

The Uvalde shooting renews questions about school security

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People who fled from fighting in Ethiopia gather in a temporary internally displaced people camp to receive first bags of wheat from the World Food Programme. Ethiopia saw a record 5.1 million displacements in 2021. Amanuel Sileshi /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Amanuel Sileshi /AFP via Getty Images

People pay their respects on Thursday at a memorial set up outside Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, the scene of the United States' most recent mass shooting. The killing of 19 children and two adults has reignited heated debates over gun control. Dario Lopez-Mills/AP hide caption

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Dario Lopez-Mills/AP

Sen. Chris Murphy, D-Conn., addresses a rally with fellow Senate Democrats and gun control advocacy groups outside the U.S. Capitol on Thursday. Organized by Moms Demand Action, Everytown for Gun Safety and Students Demand Action, the rally brought together members of Congress and gun violence survivors to demand gun safety legislation following mass shootings in Buffalo, N.Y., and Uvalde, Texas. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Senators are continuing talks during recess to find a compromise on gun legislation

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Firemen extinguish a fire at a gypsum manufacturing plant after shelling in the city of Bakhmut, in the eastern Ukrainian region of Donbas, on Friday. Russia pressed on with a deadly offensive to capture key points in the Donbas this week. Aris Messinis/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Aris Messinis/AFP via Getty Images

Gun control advocates hold signs during a protest at Discovery Green across from the National Rifle Association Annual Meeting at the George R. Brown Convention Center on Friday in Houston, Texas. Eric Thayer/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Thayer/Getty Images
LA Johnson/NPR

Cómo hablar con los niños cuando las noticias dan miedo. Una guía bilingüe

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People visit memorials Thursday for victims of the mass shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Here's what experts say police should have done in the Uvalde school shooting

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Attendees during a closing campaign rally for presidential candidate Gustavo Petro in Bogotá, Colombia. Petro is ahead in the polls for this Sunday's election, but it's expected to go to a second round in June. Andres Cardona/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Andres Cardona/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Colombia goes into elections Sunday with a leftist looking to make history

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Smallpox vaccines being administered in Paris in 1941. When the disease was eradicated and vaccination came to a stop, that created an opening for its virus relative monkeypox. Roger Viollet via Getty Images hide caption

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Roger Viollet via Getty Images

Scientists warned us about monkeypox in 1988. Here's why they were right.

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Former President Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally in Greensburg, Pa., on May 6. A federal judge on Friday dismissed Trump's lawsuit against New York Attorney General Letitia James, allowing her civil investigation into his business practices to continue. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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Gene J. Puskar/AP

Farmworkers near Fresno, Calif., pick paper trays of dried raisins off the ground and heap them onto a trailer in the final step of raisin harvest on Sept. 24, 2013. Gosia Wozniacka/AP hide caption

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Gosia Wozniacka/AP