Investigations Read the latest from NPR's investigative team. If you have solid tips or documents on stories we should probe, please send them to us.

Investigations

Police hold a perimeter near the White House as demonstrators gather to protest police brutality in the morning hours of May 31 in Washington, D.C. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Wong/Getty Images

Moderna, based in Cambridge, Mass., has reached phase three trials for its coronavirus vaccine. At the same time, its executives have sold tens of millions of dollars worth of stock, which has led to intense criticism of the company. Maddie Meyer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

'Bad Optics' Or Something More? Moderna Executives' Stock Sales Raise Concerns

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/908305074/910788796" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

José spent three months in the hospital being treated for COVID-19. "All of the nurses clapped for me as I was leaving the hospital," he says. But now he faces a long recovery at home. Eddie Quiñones for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Eddie Quiñones for NPR

Undocumented With COVID-19: Many Face A Long Recovery, Largely On Their Own

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/905822094/908306108" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Kristen Trogler was unable to find on a sex offender registry the man who sexually abused her when she was 5 years old. Ben de la Cruz/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ben de la Cruz/NPR

Sex Offender Registries Often Fail Those They Are Designed To Protect

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/808229392/905927007" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

U.S. Postmaster General Louis DeJoy arrives at an Aug. 5 meeting at the office of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Wong/Getty Images

Who Is Louis DeJoy? U.S. Postmaster General In Spotlight Ahead Of 2020 Election

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/904346060/904598707" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin attend a joint press conference after a July 2018 meeting in Helsinki. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Senate Report: Former Trump Aide Paul Manafort Shared Campaign Info With Russia

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/903512647/903561857" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Jay Clayton, chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission, testifies during a hearing on Capitol Hill in May 2019. At his 2017 confirmation hearing, Clayton pledged "zero room for bad actors in our capital markets," but enforcement of insider trading is at the lowest in decades. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Under Trump, SEC Enforcement Of Insider Trading Dropped To Lowest Point In Decades

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/901862355/902659829" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Letitia James, New York's attorney general, pauses while speaking during a news conference on Aug. 6, 2020, where she announced a civil action seeking to dissolve the National Rifle Association. Peter Foley/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Peter Foley/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Stimulus checks are prepared on May 8, 2008, in Philadelphia. In 2020, stimulus checks again went to many Americans, this time during the pandemic's economic fallout. Some of that money went to thousands of foreign workers not eligible to receive the funds. Jeff Fusco/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jeff Fusco/Getty Images

Foreign Workers Living Overseas Mistakenly Received $1,200 U.S. Stimulus Checks

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/898903600/899230778" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Melissa Hickson says no one asked her husband, Michael, shown here with stepdaughter Mia, if he wanted to keep getting treatment. "He would say: 'I want to live. I love my family and my children ... that's the reason for the three years I have fought to survive,'" she says. Melissa Hickson hide caption

toggle caption
Melissa Hickson

One Man's COVID-19 Death Raises The Worst Fears Of Many People With Disabilities

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/896882268/900081959" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An NPR investigation has identified unusual decisions around the process that lead to a Pittsburgh company winning a contract to gather COVID-19 data instead of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. smartboy10/Digital Vision Vectors/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
smartboy10/Digital Vision Vectors/Getty Images

Irregularities In COVID Reporting Contract Award Process Raise New Questions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/896645314/896980237" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Amazon has called safety a "top priority" for the company. But NPR has found more than 100 dietary supplements sold on Amazon that appear to be illegally marketed as antiviral treatments. David Becker/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David Becker/AFP via Getty Images

On Amazon, Dubious 'Antiviral' Supplements Proliferate Amid Pandemic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/894825441/895867562" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This photo, reviewed by the U.S. military and made during an escorted visit, shows the original military courtroom at the U.S. Navy base at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, on April 9, 2014. Mladen Antonov/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mladen Antonov/AFP via Getty Images

An evacuee lies on a cot at an evacuation shelter for people with disabilities in Stuart, Fla., in preparation for Hurricane Dorian on Sept. 1, 2019. Now, with the pandemic raging, officials across the South are trying to adjust their evacuation and shelter plans. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Gerald Herbert/AP

Disaster Relief For The Elderly And Disabled Is Already Hard. Now Add A Pandemic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/894148776/894343604" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In August 2017, the George R. Brown Convention Center in Houston was over capacity after floodwaters from Hurricane Harvey inundated the city. This hurricane season, congregate shelters — from school gyms to vast convention centers — risk becoming infection hot spots if evacuees pack into them as they have in the past. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

U.S. Disaster Response Scrambles To Protect People From Both Hurricanes And COVID-19

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/893286668/894074687" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Rep. James E. Clyburn, D-S.C., has asked Trump administration officials to account for how and why they selected particular companies to provide personal protective equipment. Sarah Silbiger/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sarah Silbiger/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A pedestrian walks past anti-5G graffiti in the Flatiron District of New York in May. Noam Galai/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Noam Galai/Getty Images

Anatomy Of A COVID-19 Conspiracy Theory

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/889037310/889842785" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Lawmakers are asking the Treasury Department and the IRS how many deceased people have received a coronavirus relief check from the government — and what the solution is. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Gay/AP

A couple has lunch under plexiglass protection designed by Christophe Gernigon at the H.A.N.D restaurant, on May 27, 2020, in Paris, as France eases lockdown measures taken to curb the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic. Alain Jocard/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alain Jocard/AFP via Getty Images

Business As Usual During The Pandemic, This Time Through Plexiglass

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/883904946/887128931" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

As part of a demonstration across from the White House on May 7, National Nurses United set out empty shoes for nurses who have died from COVID-19. The union is asking employers and the government to provide safe workplaces, including adequate staffing. Hospitals have been laying off and furloughing nurses due to lost revenue. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

As Hospitals Lose Revenue, More Than A Million Health Care Workers Lose Jobs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/852435761/852527761" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript