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Mental health advocates say 988, a simple three-digit number, will be easier for people to remember in the midst of a mental health emergency. T2 Images/Getty Images/Cultura RF hide caption

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T2 Images/Getty Images/Cultura RF

New Law Creates 988 Hotline For Mental Health Emergencies

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This mosaic image of asteroid Bennu is composed of 12 images collected on Dec. 2, 2018 by the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft from a range of 15 miles. NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona hide caption

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NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona

If This NASA Spacecraft Can Avoid 'Mount Doom,' It Might Nab A Bit Of Asteroid

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Conceptual artwork of quantum entanglement, one of the consequences of quantum theory. Two particles will appear to be linked across space and time, with changes to one of the particles (such as an observation or measurement) affecting the other one. Mark Garlick/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra hide caption

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Mark Garlick/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra

The Washington State Department of Agriculture team tracked the Asian giant hornet for about an hour earlier this month, before losing her signal in a forest. Courtesy of the Washington State Department of Agriculture hide caption

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Courtesy of the Washington State Department of Agriculture

Foiled Again: Murder Hornet Eludes Washington State Scientists

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Rebecca Knill speaks at TED@WellsFargo, February 5, 2020, at the Knight Theater in Charlotte, NC. Photo: Ryan Lash / TED Ryan Lash/Courtesy of TED hide caption

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Ryan Lash/Courtesy of TED

Rebecca Knill: Technology Has Come So Far—When Will Our Mindset Catch-Up?

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Dallas Taylor speaks as part of TED2020: Uncharted. May 21, 2020. Photo courtesy of TED. Courtesy of TED/Courtesy of TED hide caption

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Courtesy of TED/Courtesy of TED

Dallas Taylor: What Can We Learn From Listening To Silence?

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jimhudspeth_2019s-embed Ryan Lash/Courtesy of TED hide caption

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Ryan Lash/Courtesy of TED

Jim Hudspeth: How Do We Hear — And How Do We Lose Our Ability To Hear?

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Emily Garti, a junior studying nutrition, gets her twice-weekly COVID-19 test at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

The Tricky Business Of Coronavirus Testing On College Campuses

We hit the road with NPR Education Reporter Elissa Nadworny. She's been on a weekslong road trip to get an up-close view of how colleges across the U.S. are handling the pandemic. On today's show, she tells us how one university has been using mass testing to fight the spread of the coronavirus on its campus. It's a strategy that's run into some challenges, namely, student behavior.

The Tricky Business Of Coronavirus Testing On College Campuses

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Tobacco plants are being used in the development of COVID-19 vaccines. One is already being tested in humans. Rehman Asad/Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Rehman Asad/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Tobacco Plants Contribute Key Ingredient For COVID-19 Vaccine

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Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, says Thanksgiving gatherings could cause coronavirus cases to rise even faster than they already are. Graeme Jennings/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Graeme Jennings/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Pandemic 'Halftime': U.S. Looks At Lessons Learned As Fall & Holidays Near

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Matt Kasson

A Disturbing Twinkie That Has, So Far, Defied Science

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"The excitement for me has been to slowly uncover the secret lives of many of these cryptic animals," says Craig Foster. "My incredible octopus teacher, she helped me in many ways to uncover many of those lives, because she's in the middle of this food web." Netflix hide caption

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Netflix

Filmmaker Finds An Unlikely Underwater Friend In 'My Octopus Teacher'

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Brain cells that monitor liquid, mineral and salt levels in the body influence what types of drinks we crave when thirsty. Krisanapong Detraphiphat/Getty Images hide caption

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Krisanapong Detraphiphat/Getty Images

Water Or A Sports Drink? These Brain Cells May Decide Which One We Crave

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The number of people dying from COVID-19 since May 10 is on average 50% higher than every other country in the study, adjusting for population size. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Police stand guard outside of a rally with Vice President Pence at Weldall Manufacturing on Tuesday in Waukesha, Wis. Wisconsin is currently seeing a surge in coronavirus cases at the same time that the number of daily cases nationally is rising. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

The U.S. Pandemic Is Stuck In A Cycle Of Endless Ups And Downs

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NASA's New Horizons spacecraft captured this high-resolution enhanced color view of Pluto on July 14, 2015. NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute hide caption

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NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

Pluto Has White-Capped Mountains, But Not Because There's Snow

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A health care worker tests a patient for the coronavirus in Nevada in July. Scientists say a 25-year-old Nevada man was infected with the virus twice. It is the first confirmed case of reinfection in the U.S. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

Scientists Confirm Nevada Man Was Infected Twice With Coronavirus

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Monarch butterflies, like this one in Temascaltepec, Mexico, use ultraviolet polarized light to help them navigate in flight. Omar Torres/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Omar Torres/AFP via Getty Images

Butterflies Have Hearts In Their Wings. You Won't Believe Where They Have Eyes

Adriana Briscoe, a professor of biology and ecology at UC Irvine, studies vision in butterflies. As part of her research, she's trained them to detect light of a certain color. She also explains why they bask in the sunlight, and why some of them have 'hearts' in their wings. Plus, you'll never guess where their photoreceptors are.

Butterflies Have Hearts In Their Wings. You Won't Believe Where They Have Eyes

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Grey reef sharks, seen in Fiji, are among the top species of sharks fished for their liver oil. Reinhard Dirscherl/Ullstein Bild via Getty Images hide caption

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Reinhard Dirscherl/Ullstein Bild via Getty Images

A Coronavirus Vaccine Could Kill Half A Million Sharks, Conservationists Warn

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