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Kenyan mountaineer James Kagambi (C), 62, is welcomed upon his arrival as the first Kenyan who reached the summit of Mount Everest, the world's highest peak of 8,849 meters, at Jomo Kenyatta International Airport in Nairobi, Kenya, on May 23, 2022. Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP via Getty Images

James Kagambi: The 62 Year Old Who Just Summited Everest

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Demonstrators attend a candlelight vigil Wednesday in Fairfax, Va., for the victims of the Uvalde and Buffalo mass shootings. Allison Bailey/Reuters Connect hide caption

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Allison Bailey/Reuters Connect

Research shows policies that may help prevent mass shootings — and some that don't

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Green the Chow Chow sits in the grooming area at the 142nd Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show at The Piers on February 12, 2018 in New York City. The show is scheduled to see 2,882 dogs from all 50 states take part in this year's competition. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Dog Breeds Are A Behavioral Myth... Sorry!

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ATLANTA, GA - MAY 21: People hold signs during a protest against recently passed abortion ban bills at the Georgia State Capitol building, on May 21, 2019 in Atlanta, Georgia. The Georgia "heartbeat" bill would ban abortion when a fetal heartbeat is detected. (Photo by Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images) Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images hide caption

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Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

How Changes in Abortion Law Could Impact Community Health

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The shapes in this salt crystal are consistent with what would be expected for microorganisms. Kathy Benison hide caption

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Kathy Benison

This 830-million-year-old crystal might contain life. And we're about to open it

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Abortion rights demonstrators gather near the Washington Monument during a nationwide rally in support of abortion rights in Washington, D.C., US, on May 14, 2022. Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Why Abortion Access Is Important For A Healthy Community

Abortion access has been leading political news in recent weeks. But what happens when we look at abortion as a health care tool that betters public health? Today, Emily talks to Liza Fuentes, a Senior Research Scientist at the Guttmacher Institute, a research organization that focuses on sexual and reproductive health. Fuentes says abortion access is an important part of health care for a community and losing access can exacerbate income and health inequalities.

Why Abortion Access Is Important For A Healthy Community

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The International Space Station depends on a mix of U.S. and Russian parts. "I hope we can hold it together as long as we can," says former NASA astronaut Scott Kelly. NASA hide caption

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NASA

Russia's war in Ukraine is threatening an outpost of cooperation in space

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Jada Yuan with her grandmother, Chien-Shiung Wu. Wu/Yuan family hide caption

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Wu/Yuan family

An aerial photo taken in April 2020 shows the scenery of a giant karst sinkhole in China's Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region. A similar sinkhole was found earlier this month with an ancient forest at the bottom with trees towering over 100 feet tall. Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images

Rahima Banu, pictured with her mother in Bangladesh in 1975, is recorded as having the last known naturally-occurring case of the deadly form of smallpox. Daniel Tarantola/WHO hide caption

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Daniel Tarantola/WHO

How Rahima came to hold a special place in smallpox history — and help ensure its end

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Particle and experimental physicist Chien-Shiung Wu. University Archives, Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Columbia University Libraries hide caption

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University Archives, Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Columbia University Libraries

The Queen of Nuclear Physics (Part One): Chien-Shiung Wu's Discovery

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Girl grimaces in front of a spoon of bitter medicine. timsa/Getty Images hide caption

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timsa/Getty Images

TASTE BUDDIES: Why Bitter Tastes Better For Some

Love the bitter bite of dark chocolate, leafy greens or black licorice? Your genetics may be the reason why. Today on the show, host Aaron Scott talks to scientist Masha Niv about how our bitter taste buds work and how a simple taste test can predict your tolerance for some bitter things. Plus, what bitter receptors elsewhere in the body have to do with your health.

TASTE BUDDIES: Why Bitter Tastes Better For Some

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Tony D'Amato, director of the University of Vermont's forestry program, visits an experiment site in the Silvio O. Conte National Fish and Wildlife Refuge. Emma Jacobs for NPR hide caption

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Emma Jacobs for NPR

Foresters hope 'assisted migration' will preserve landscapes as the climate changes

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Tampon and Calendar Carol Yepes/Getty Images hide caption

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Carol Yepes/Getty Images

Who Else Can See Your Period Tracker Data?

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Financial Times

Tracking 1 million COVID deaths

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Flags at the base of the Washington Monument fly at half staff to mark one 1 million deaths attributed to COVID-19. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

How Many Of America's One Million COVID Deaths Were Preventable?

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A COVID Memorial Project installation in September, 2020 marked 200,000 lives lost in the COVID-19 pandemic. The official death toll in the U.S. is on the cusp of a million. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

How Vaccine Misinformation Spread Through The Parenting World

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