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Secretary of State Mike Pompeo testifies before a Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing in July. The State Department has lifted its global health advisory warning against international travel. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe bows Thursday in front of a memorial to people who were killed in the 1945 atomic bombing of Hiroshima. Philip Fong/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Philip Fong/AFP via Getty Images

Hiroshima Atomic Bombing Raising New Questions 75 Years Later

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Maria Ressa, CEO of the Rappler news site, leaves a Philippine regional trial court after being convicted for cyber libel on June 15. Ressa, a veteran journalist and outspoken critic of President Rodrigo Duterte, is the focus of A Thousand Cuts, a documentary to be released virtually in the U.S. on Aug. 7. Ezra Acayan/Getty Images hide caption

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Ezra Acayan/Getty Images

Philippine Journalist Maria Ressa: 'Journalism Is Activism'

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Former Colombian President (2002-2010) and Sen. Álvaro Uribe goes to a hearing before the Supreme Court of Justice in a case over witness tampering in Bogotá, Colombia, on Oct. 8, 2019. The Supreme Court has now ordered Uribe be put under house arrest. Raul Arboleda/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Raul Arboleda/AFP via Getty Images

Colombia's Ex-President Uribe Is Put Under House Arrest, Catches Coronavirus

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An aerial view of demolished structures at the port, damaged by Tuesday's explosion in Beirut, Lebanon on Wednesday. The enormous blast, which officials said was driven by thousands of tons of ammonium nitrate, killed at least 137 people and injured thousands more. Haytham El Achkar/Getty Images hide caption

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Haytham El Achkar/Getty Images

Beirut Death Toll Rises After Enormous Explosion

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Aboubakar Soumahoro speaks at a protest in Rome last month. "If the workers lack dignity and rights, the food they provide is virtually rotten," he says in a new short documentary, The Invisibles. Patrizia Cortellessa/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrizia Cortellessa/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

In Italy, A Migrants' Advocate Fights For The 'Invisibles'

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Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi (center) performs the groundbreaking ceremony of a temple dedicated to the Hindu god Lord Ram in Ayodhya, India, on Wednesday. Rajesh Kumar Singh/AP hide caption

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Rajesh Kumar Singh/AP

Stimulus checks are prepared on May 8, 2008, in Philadelphia. In 2020, stimulus checks again went to many Americans, this time during the pandemic's economic fallout. Some of that money went to thousands of foreign workers not eligible to receive the funds. Jeff Fusco/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Fusco/Getty Images

Foreign Workers Living Overseas Mistakenly Received $1,200 U.S. Stimulus Checks

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Lebanese soldiers search for survivors on Wednesday, one day after a massive explosion rocked Beirut, Lebanon. The explosion flattened much of a port and damaged buildings across Beirut, sending a giant mushroom cloud into the sky. Hassan Ammar/AP hide caption

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Hassan Ammar/AP

Thousands of couples have been separated by pandemic-related travel restrictions. Lots of them are unmarried. Johannes Mahele and Joresa Blount; Corsi Crumple and Sean Donovan; Todd Alsup and Sebastian Pinde hide caption

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Johannes Mahele and Joresa Blount; Corsi Crumple and Sean Donovan; Todd Alsup and Sebastian Pinde

Can Love Conquer Travel Bans? Couples Divided By Pandemic Are Rallying To Reunite

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People pass a new coronavirus test center at the airport in Munich, Germany, Wednesday, July 29, 2020. Passengers have the possibility to be tested for the coronavirus free of charge. Matthias Schrader/AP hide caption

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Matthias Schrader/AP

Juan Carlos, the former king of Spain, pictured in 2016, is being investigated for possible corruption and is leaving for an undisclosed country. Daniel Perez/Getty Images hide caption

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The expedition cruise ship MS Roald Amundsen is moored at a quay in Tromso, Norway, on Saturday. At least 36 crew members from the ship have tested positive for the coronavirus. Ruen Stoltz Bertinussen/NTB Scanpix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ruen Stoltz Bertinussen/NTB Scanpix/AFP via Getty Images

Tianna Spears joined the State Department in 2018, looking forward to the promise of a fulfilling career. She left after less than two years, and is one of a growing number to speak out recently about the special challenges faced by minority foreign service officers. Kennedi Carter for NPR hide caption

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Kennedi Carter for NPR

'I Was Asked If I Stole My Car': Black Diplomats Describe Harassment At U.S. Borders

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