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National Security

Director of National Intelligence Avril Haines testifying before a Senate hearing earlier this month. During a May 15 hearing, she identified Russia as the greatest foreign threat to this year's U.S. elections. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

TikTok sued the Biden administration in response to a new law that bans the video app in the U.S. unless it is sold in the next 12 months. Michael Dwyer/AP hide caption

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Michael Dwyer/AP

U.S. Department of Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas speaks at a presser about immigration and the Trump-era expulsion policy Title 42 that is set to end next week on May 5, 2023 in Brownsville, Texas. Michael Gonzalez/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Gonzalez/Getty Images

Biden's new asylum rule would have 'minimal' impact on unauthorized border crossings

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Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas talks with NPR's Morning Edition Wednesday, May 8, 2024, at the department's headquarters in Washington, D.C. Michael Zamora/NPR hide caption

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Michael Zamora/NPR

Is Biden's border plan working? Here's how the top immigration official says it is

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President Biden is seen at the White House on May 2. In an interview with CNN on Wednesday, Biden said he would halt some weapons shipments to Israel if Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu ordered a full invasion of Rafah. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

A U.S. Navy ship docks off the coast of the Gaza Valley area in the central Gaza Strip on April 29, 2024. The ship is expected to participate in the construction work of a floating naval dock to deliver more humanitarian aid to Gaza Strip announced in March. Ashraf Amra/Anadolu via Getty Images hide caption

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Ashraf Amra/Anadolu via Getty Images

A woman carries a child as she walks through the al-Hol refugee camp in northeastern Syria in October 2023. Delil Souleiman/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Delil Souleiman/AFP via Getty Images

After years in a Syrian ISIS camp, a 10-person American family is back in the U.S.

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Ryan Riccucci, division chief of law enforcement operational programs for U.S. Customs and Border Protection, says he feels his agency is often misunderstood by the U.S. public. Here, he poses for a portrait in his office at the Tucson Sector headquarters in Arizona on March 26. Ash Ponders for NPR hide caption

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Ash Ponders for NPR

How a U.S. Customs and Border Protection veteran sees his agency's mission

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Álvaro Enciso places crosses at sites where migrants are known to have died in the borderland, this cross represents the death of Nolberto Torres-Zayas just east of Arivaca, Arizona on Wednesday, March 27, 2024. Torres-Zayas died of hyperthermia in 2009, not far from a Humane Borders water cache that had been vandalized and drained. Ash Ponders for NPR hide caption

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Ash Ponders for NPR

Is it easy for migrants to enter the U.S.? We went to the border to find out

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The new guidelines were prompted by increased rates of breast cancer in women in their 40s. They recommend mammograms every other year, starting at age 40. izusek/Getty Images hide caption

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izusek/Getty Images

Mammograms should start at age 40, new guidelines recommend

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A newly signed law requires that the Chinese-owned TikTok app be sold to satisfy national security concerns. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

China's influence operations against the U.S. are bigger than TikTok

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Secretary of the Army Christine Wormuth looks over the latest version of the M1A2 Abrams main battle tank as she tours the Joint Systems Manufacturing Center on Feb. 16, 2023, in Lima, Ohio. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Carlos Osorio/AP

President Biden on Wednesday announces the signing of a $95 billion military assistance package for Ukraine, Israel and Taiwan. Ukraine says the aid is critical as it seeks to regain momentum on the battlefield from Russia. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

The American and Ukrainian flags wave in the wind outside of the Capitol. The Senate is moving ahead with $95 billion in war aid to Ukraine, Israel and Taiwan. Mariam Zuhaib/AP hide caption

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Mariam Zuhaib/AP

A TV screen shows a file image of a North Korean missile launch during a news program at the Seoul Railway Station in South Korea on April 22, 2024. North Korea fired multiple suspected short-range ballistic missiles toward its eastern waters on Monday, South Korea's military said. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Ahn Young-joon/AP

The U.S.-operated GPS has falsely located planes, people and ships, sometimes placing them at the Beirut's international airport. Hassan Ammar/AP hide caption

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Hassan Ammar/AP

Israel fakes GPS locations to deter attacks, but it also throws off planes and ships

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A billboard in central Tehran, Iran, depicts named Iranian ballistic missiles in service, with text in Arabic reading "the honest [person's] promise" and text in Persian reading "Israel is weaker than a spider's web," on April 15. Iran attacked Israel over the weekend with missiles, which it said was a response to a deadly strike on its consulate building in Damascus, Syria. Atta Kenare/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Atta Kenare/AFP via Getty Images