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A protester in Hong Kong checks his phone for police activity during a protest against the government in Hong Kong's New Territories, in August. Aidan Marzo/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Aidan Marzo/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images
Daniel Wood/NPR

Twitter Analysis Shows How Trump Tweets Differently About Nonwhite Lawmakers

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Employers are using virtual reality to train millions of workers in everything from operating machines to how to handle active shooters. Courtesy of Strivr hide caption

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Courtesy of Strivr

Virtual Reality Goes To Work, Helping Train Employees

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Visitors are tracked by face recognition technology from state-owned surveillance equipment manufacturer Hikvision at the Security China 2018 expo in Beijing. Hikvision is one of several firms that have been added to a U.S. trade blacklist. Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

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Ng Han Guan/AP

Christopher Wylie, a Canadian data scientist, speaks on Aug. 31 at the Antidote festival at the Sydney Opera House about his role in exposing the work of Cambridge Analytica. Fairfax Media hide caption

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Fairfax Media

An app uses a smartphone camera to detect leukocoria, a pale reflection from the back of the eye. It can be an early sign of disease. Here it appears light brown compared the healthy eye. Munson et al., Sci. Adv. 2019; 5 eaax 6363 hide caption

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Munson et al., Sci. Adv. 2019; 5 eaax 6363

An App That Can Catch Early Signs Of Eye Disease In A Flash

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Jan Stromme/Getty Images

FBI Director Christopher Wray speaks Friday at the Justice Department in Washington, D.C., during a summit on warrant-proof encryption and its impact on child exploitation cases. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Taken in aggregate, the billions of online searches we make every day say a lot about our most private thoughts and biases. Lee Woodgate/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Lee Woodgate/Getty Images/Ikon Images

I, Robot: Our Changing Relationship With Technology

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Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi speaks at an Uber products launch in San Francisco on Sept. 26. The company is launching its Uber Works app in Chicago, aiming to make it easier for workers to find temporary shifts. Philip Pacheco /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Philip Pacheco /AFP/Getty Images

Adam Mosseri, head of Instagram, speaks about the social media platform's anti-bullying efforts at the F8 developers conference in San Jose, Calif., on April 30. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

Instagram Now Lets You Control Your Bully's Comments

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Left: Volunteers take part in a "mapathon" organized by the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team. Right: OpenStreetMap contributors pinpoint dump sites along rivers and waterways in Dar es Salaam in an effort to predict and prevent flooding in the Tanzanian city. Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team hide caption

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Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team

Neil stands in a room with military cyber operators from Joint Task Force ARES to launch an operation that would become one of the largest and longest offensive cyber operations in U.S. military history. Josh Kramer for NPR hide caption

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Josh Kramer for NPR

How The U.S. Hacked ISIS

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